Oxford Diecast goes underground to reveal a terrific trio of support vehicles


Oxford Diecast London Underground Land Rover Freelander, Ford Transit Connect and Ford Transit Dropside

Price: £5.95 each for the Freelander and Connect, £13.95 for the Transit Dropside
Ref: 76FRE005, 76FTC011 & 76TPU003
Scale: 1/76

We've put these three diecast models together to review as, although they are sold individually, they make a really nice set to go with another recent release (reviewed previously), the Ford Transit Mk5 SWB Low Roof (76FT031), also in matching London Underground livery.

The Land Rover Freelander is deployed as an Emergency Incident Vehicle and is painted a brilliant white. The emergency graphics are printed in bright red and blue with yellow and red hazard markings across the back. Registered VK12 GPU, fleet identification 7429LR is finely printed blue on the wings at the bottom of the window pillars. The London Underground roundel  logo appears on the bonnet and also alongside the London Underground Emergency Incident Vehicle lettering on the driver and front passenger doors.  A red chequered effect runs the length of the sides above the red and blue masked skirts between the wheels.

The Ford Transit Connect is registered LS58 XDV.  On this model, the London Transport roundel is featured on both side panels, across the lower part of the rear offside door and across the bonnet.  The white colour scheme is enhanced with red and blue skirt masking while the interior of the van is black. Fleet number 6683F is printed under the quarter lights on both doors; and the offside rear door carries the warning "This vehicle is fitted with a security device".

The Ford Transit Dropside retains the familiar sloping front end and extended cab area but is designed with a blue open dropside type back, mounted on a black chassis. The vehicle interior is also black and the model is registered LL11 LOJ.

These models are all superbly finished and the graphics are printed very well indeed with some rather fine detailing. All three would all look equally at home on either a modern London railway layout or as part of an emergency vehicle line-up.